Six Pixels of Separation - The Blog
September 13, 2010 7:15 AM

In Praise Of Lazy

As excited as you and I are about Digital Marketing and Social Media, don't ever lose sight of the fact that most people are not and will not ever really care.

We used to talk about the 1% rule - that only one percent of an active audience will actually take the time to create content. That number has probably shifted higher because creating content is much easier and can be done in short order. It doesn't take long to pump out a 140 character tweet on Twitter, and it's equally easy to upload a picture or even your status on Facebook. Platforms like LinkedIn make it simple to create content by allowing people to not only update their status, but to also answer questions. It doesn't take much to "like" something on Facebook or give a YouTube video a thumbs up (or down).

Still, the masses don't care.

I recently overheard two people talking about Twitter. It went something like this:

  • Person #1: "How many people do you follow on Twitter?"
  • Person #2: "Only a couple of hundred."
  • Person #1: "Do you ever talk to them?"
  • Person #2: "You can talk to people?"
  • Person #1: "Yeah, you use the @ sign and then they know you're replying to something they said."
  • Person #2: "Why would I want to do that?"

I can't make this stuff up.

If the amount of people who open a Twitter account but hardly use it isn't staggering to you (more on that here: Twitter users not so social after all), imagine the percentage of people on places like Facebook, YouTube and beyond who don't even understand the basics of how to get the most out of their online experience. It's not an indictment on the good work we're all doing, it's a reality.

How much work do you want to do?

There was a lot of buzz the other week about Digg and their all-new redesign (which included some additional site functionality). Many people think that Digg is doing this because their traffic is plummeting and they're loosing relevancy in the marketplace (or that they're trying to be more attractive to brands and advertisers). It's not that. The Digg model is simply not something that the masses care about. Meaning: people just want the news. They want it well-produced (in text, images, audio and video) and they want it filtered and edited. Most people come home after a long day of work and they want to unwind. They don't want to scour the Web for information, create a profile, upload a link, Digg it, comment on it, share it, promote it or talk about it on Twitter and Blogs.

It's all in the balance.

Don't be upset that the masses all don't have Google Alerts or have a news reader set-up on their desktop. Most people are not going to download a Twitter client like TweetDeck or Seesmic Desktop so that they can have a Nasdaq-esque screen flowing constantly with each and every tweet that is related to their lives. Most people are mass media lazy. They're used to sitting back and letting the media wash over them (from a TV sitcom to an article in Vanity Fair). They want to be entertained. They want to forget about their work day. They're not interested in working more or creating their own media. The balance comes in recognizing both types of people. The balance comes in creating media (as a brand) that appeals to those who just want the information versus those who want to do something with that same information.

Do you think this is going to change - and that people will become more active - or are we all just too stuck in our ways?

By Mitch Joel


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