Six Pixels of Separation - The Blog
July 30, 2016 6:05 AM

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #319

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see".

Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another: 

  • Bad Sex In Fiction Awards: The Connoisseur's Compendium - Nothing In The Rule Book. "Sometimes good authors write awful things. This compendium of (probably NSFW) winners for the Bad Sex in Fiction Award has some doozies. Some metaphors should never happen: 'punching smoothly in and out of her like a sewing machine,' or 'like a spoon scraping the inside of a soft-boiled egg.'" (Alistair for Hugh).
  • The Movie Set That Ate Itself - GQ. "This is a crazy tale of deranged film production that borders on nation-building and cult worship. Like, some filmmakers go for authenticity -- but few of them change the size of the plumbing to recreate a particular toilet-flushing sound." (Alistair for Mitch).
  • Why bad ideas refuse to die - The Guardian. "Did you know that different parts of your tongue sense different tastes? Sweetness on the tip, saltiness on the sides, and bitter at the back? Well if you know that, you are wrong. Why do bad ideas, and errors of fact, persist?" (Hugh for Alistair).
  • When the Robots Rise - The National Interest. "A meaty look at the complex economic and social problems likely to arise from our increasing move to automation. I'm not sure that I agree with the author's conclusions, but regardless we have some massive changes to our society on the horizon, and now is the time to start thinking seriously about how we should approach them." (Hugh for Mitch).
  • Martian Colonists Could Be Genetically Engineered for Democracy - Nautilus. "Somewhere in a lab, right now, scientists are toying with something called Gene Drive. They're doing this now to get rid of the mosquitos that are carrying the Zika virus. Well, if the science is sound, why not use it to suppress or augment other stuff that we can find in our genes and DNA? You know, stuff like the desire to be a better democratic citizen..." (Mitch for Alistair).
  • Confessor. Feminist. Adult. What the Hell Happened to Howard Stern? - The New York Times"Two of the media celebrities that I most admire in terms of their prowess at conducting interviews/conversations are Charlie Rose and Howard Stern. Everyone gets Stern wrong. Everyone. If you have ever spent any time listening to his in-depth celebrity interviews, it is a masterclass for everyone who has to have a conversation in the real world (be it over coffee or if you're trying to create a compelling podcast). He has an intuitive instinct that weaves the conversation in a very dramatic way. The end result is something we all want: candour and honesty, in a world of press releases and Instagram photos. This article does a good job of explaining just how great of a storyteller he is." (Mitch for Hugh).

Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play.

By Mitch Joel

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July 29, 201611:35 PM

Noodling Towards Greatness

This is not supposed to be Shakespeare.

I don't toil and sweat over every character, every word, every sentence, the grammar or the flow. I am noodling around with an idea. Something that I am feeling. I am trying to bring that feeling out in words. I'm working through the idea through these words. I'm hoping that the completed piece of work clicks with you. That it solves a problem that you have been thinking about. That it inspires you to ask a better question. That it pushes you to appreciate the brand(s) that you are developing. This is not (nor ever will it be) a solution. I am noodling with an idea and trying to get that idea to go somewhere. To take you along for the ride. Musicians do this with their instruments. The best noodling becomes a song (something you might have heard). I do this with words. The best words become an article (for a major publication), a chapter in one of my business books, a segment in one of my presentations. Maybe, sometimes, a hit blog post. Most of the time, it just fills this space. That's what this blog is about. Blogs have changed. Most people treat each post like it needs to be perfect. That's fine too. We all have our own ways of working through our creative process.   

Silly rabbit, clicks are for kids.

Most days, I hate my stuff. It's not click-worthy. It doesn't spike on Medium. It doesn't get a retweet from those with verified accounts or celebrity followers. It just sits here. It just sits there on Facebook, on Twitter and/or LinkedIn. It doesn't move those social media needles that so many people are obsessed with. I have the blessing and curse of time on my side. The blessing, because I've been writing (multiple times a week) here, at Six Pixels of Separation, since 2003 and I've managed to build up a brand and audience over the course of the thirteen years. People know my writing style, and there's not the expectation that every post is akin to an article. The curse, because many people who blog less, and have been doing it for far less time have lapped me. They have a bigger audience, and spend a significant amount of time sharing, repurposing and pushing their posts. They write post as if it's an article for a business publication. It's working for them. Good on them. If I have an extra five minutes in my life, I prefer to write and create something that's itching me inside, over the self-promotion. That's not a judgement for those who are better at self-promoting, it's just how it is.

Great content. Great look at process. 

I spent many years working in the music industry. I'm also a bit of a musician. I studied the electric bass (informally and in a post secondary education format). I love the sound of the instrument (and those who have mastered it) more than I like playing it (hence, my other podcast, Groove - The No Treble Podcast, where I am slowly trying to build the largest oral history of electric bass players). With that, I follow a lot of YouTube channels that focus on the instrument. Unless you are a musician, you probably have not heard about Ernie Ball. Ernie Ball is one of the world's top makers of electric and acoustic guitar strings, bass strings, and other guitar accessories. Some of history's greatest musicians including Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Slash, The Rolling Stones, Angus Young, Eagles, Jeff Beck, Pete Townshend, Metallica, and more use their strings. As a form of content marketing, Ernie Ball created a documentary series titled, The Pursuit of Tone. It's done in partnership with AT&T and these documentaries (which look at how musicians create the way that do) play on Direct TV and AT&T U-VERSE channel. Clips can often be found on the Ernie Ball YouTube channel. Next month, The Pursuit of Tone features Tom DeLonge (lead vocalist and songwriter for the bands Blink-182, Box Car Racer and Angels & Airwaves). For over two decades and 25 million albums, Tom's guitar tone and riff-driven style has become one of alternative and modern rock's most identifiable sound, which plays an undeniable role in what became the sound of California punk and alternative rock during the nineties. The four minute clip below from this documentary really brings together so many interesting angles of the work that we do as content creators, marketers and brand ambassadors. One, the content within this clip really speaks to the idea and value of noodling with your ideas, putting them out there, experimenting and trying things (even simple ones) that could lead to big results. Two, Ernie Ball is really thinking about how to use content marketing (across multiple media) to build their brand. It's long form content. It's powerful. A TV show, but with lots of online content. It's well-produced, smart and not something that is readily available in the marketplace. They are owning it. Three, if the TV show doesn't gain traction, this type of content could have its own life within their own YouTube channel (or augmented with distribution and more). A very smart and savvy content marketing play. They have TV (so why not use it?), but this kind of content could just as easily live online only.

Watch this video. The content is inspiring. The format is inspiring: Ernie Ball - The Pursuit of Tone - Tom DeLonge.

By Mitch Joel

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July 25, 2016 8:13 AM

The Big, Massive Business Of Pokemon Go And Apps

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio broadcasting out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly to SoundCloud, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry and Heather B. morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel.

This week we discussed: 

  • Terry and Heather are away on vacation. I'm sitting in with Pierre Landry.
  • Pokemon Go continues to capture everyone's imagination. This past week, Brooklyn-based Nick Johnson became the first player to publicly confirm that he had caught all 142 Pokémon that are available in the US. It took a lot of work, according to a Business Insider article, including hiring an Uber to drive him in circles to catch one of the last Pokémon he needed. Desperate times call for desperate measure. 
  • Pokemon Go isn't all fun and games. It's big business too. Apple could take in close to $3 billion in revenue from Pokemon Go in the next one to two years, as gamers buy stuff like PokeCoins in-app, according to analysts and a report in The Guardian. Apparently, Apple keeps about 30% of revenue from apps like this on iOS. Pokémon Go's ratio of paid users to total users was 10 times that of Candy Crush, the hit game from King Digital that generated more than $1billion of revenue in both 2013 and 2014. Users in the United States are spending far more time playing the game than they are using Facebook or WhatsApp, according to app analytics firm Sensor Tower. So, it's looking like another cash windfall for Apple.
  • Our real-like Tony Stark/Iron Man has published his master plan for the next ten years. Last week, Tesla's Elon Musk unveiled his Master Plan, Part Deux. He also looked back on his first Master Plan (and the progress was astounding to read). What's next for Elon, Tesla... And our collective future? 1. Create stunning solar roofs with seamlessly integrated battery storage. 2. Expand the electric vehicle product line to address all major segments. 3. Develop a self-driving capability that is 10X safer than manual via massive fleet learning. 3. Enable your car to make money for you when you aren't using it. And, that's just for Tesla. Let's see what's next for SpaceX
  • App of the week: Captio.

Listen here...

By Mitch Joel

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July 24, 2016 7:51 AM

The Digital Transformation Playbook With David Rogers - This Week's Six Pixels Podcast

Episode #524 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to.

These days, you can't throw a business professional down a flight of stairs without the words "digital transformation" tumbling out of their mouths. Every business, in every space (small, medium and large) is faced with how digital is transforming the very landscape of business today. When I think of digital transformation and what it takes, I think about David Rogers. Recently, David published his latest book, The Digital Transformation Playbook. David is a Columbia Business School professor, brand strategist, and the founder of the Center on Global Brand Leadership's acclaimed BRITE conference on brands, innovation, and technology. Famed ad critic, Bob Garfield, said this about the book: "Seldom have the effects of digital media on legacy industries and innovators alike been so succinctly and scholarly-ly explained. I won't much detail the Playbook, except to say it breaks down the five main areas of business turned upside down by digital revolution: customers, competition, data, innovation and value. Not to put too fine a point on it, everything we learned about these fundamentals since the Industrial Revolution has ceased to be true. To be even blunter, take Jack Welch's triumphalist bestseller from the old analog days and set it on fire; it is worthless. Rogers uses case histories to illustrate how and why the times they are a changing'. And more importantly, exactly how to adapt." David is also the author of The Network Is Your Customer, The Handbook On Brand And Experience Management, There's No Business That's Not Show Business, and many other pieces of research. Have you been struggling with digital transformation? Enjoy the conversation... 

You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #524.

By Mitch Joel

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July 23, 2016 6:36 AM

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #318

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see".

Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another: 

Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play.

By Mitch Joel

Utilities:


July 22, 2016 8:13 AM

Sophisticated Marketer's Podcast - Pokemon Go, Personal Branding And The Power Of Great Writing In A Video-Rich World

Jason Miller is a rocking tour du force of business, marketing and conversation. Jason is a rock photographer and loves all music that is hard and heavy almost as much as I do. He has a history in the music... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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July 21, 201611:53 PM

The Next Economy Company

There have been so many changes in business because of technology. We're just getting started. There is no doubt that we have seen massive shifts in how consumers buy, connect and share in the past decade. It's hard to imagine... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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July 20, 201611:47 PM

Never Has LinkedIn Been More Powerful Than Today

LinkedIn is the most powerful weapon you have in building your reputation.  I believe this. Wholeheartedly. The problem, of course, is that we live in this strange new on-demand world. What do you want? What do you need? We can... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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July 18, 2016 8:43 AM

Is Paid Dating The Uber Of Dating?

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio broadcasting out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is... Read more

By Mitch Joel

Utilities:


July 17, 2016 8:21 AM

Maria Konnikova On The Confidence Game - This Week's Six Pixels Podcast

Episode #523 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. One of the most fascinating writers on the scene these days is Maria Konnikova. She's a regular columnist at... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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