Six Pixels of Separation - The Blog
March 2, 2015 8:13 AM

How Did The Color Of A Dress Become A Bigger Story Than Net Neutrality?

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio broadcasting out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly to SoundCloud, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry and Heather B. morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel.

This week we discussed:

  • Live Long And Prosper, everyone.
  • The Internet went insane last week. It goes insane quite often, but last week was a real exception. What color was that dress? Blue and black? White and gold? Many experts weighed in. It got a lot of mass media attention (like, right now). But, for me, it spoke to two interesting (and divergent) results of moments like this. One, when the intelligentsia steps in and we get these awesome, high brow, pieces about how nothing really has any color. Two, how wild our world is, when things like this become global and viral memes. We are a peculiar people.
  • Big news for people who use the Internet (that, would be all of us!). In the US, the net neutrality law (that had been talked about for years) has come to pass. The Internet will now be regulated as a public utility. The FCC (Federal Communications Commission) has adopted net neutrality regulations. What does it mean? The new rules prohibit broadband providers from blocking or slowing down traffic on wired and wireless networks. They also ban Internet service providers from offering paid priority services that could allow them to charge content companies, such as Netflix, fees to access Internet "fast lanes" to reach customers more quickly when networks are congested. It also means that may, in fact, start seeing the Internet as a human right (which is the law in certain European countries).
  • Francois wants a great translation app. We talked about this last week. Google Translate app
  • App of the week: Nat Geo View.

Listen here...

By Mitch Joel

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March 1, 2015 9:25 AM

The New Cluetrain Manifesto

Episode #451 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to.

If ever there was a book written about what marketing "could" be, it would be The Cluetrain Manifesto. The book was published in 2000 and presented 95 theses organized around the Internet, culture, society and business (it also happens to be one of my my most loved books). Many point to this book as the genesis of social media. Many recite the infamous "markets are conversations" line from it. The truth is that many don't really understand the depth, value and insights that the book delivers. It's amazing to look at the content of this book - in 2015 - to see how much of it has come true... and how far we still have to go. It's something that two out of the four original authors have been thinking a lot about. Doc Searls and David Weinberger put together New Clues. It is 121 more theses authored for 2015. While, Rick Levine and Chris Locke opted out of taking another kick at the can, Searls and Weinberger provide much more fodder for all of us to think about. Technology has - without question - moved at an exponential pace, so it's interesting to see what these two think needs to happen next. Enjoy the conversation... 

You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #451.

By Mitch Joel

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February 28, 2015 9:14 AM

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #245

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see".

Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:

  • When You Are the Adversary - Quinn Norton. "I met Quinn Norton at Foo Camp a few years ago. She was serving homebrew limoncello (with an Aperture Labs label) to all comers, and telling stories. But it wasn't until afterwards that I realized just what a fearless storyteller she was, having ventured into thorny topics like Occupy and Aaron Swartz. In this hour-long talk at HopeX, she speaks about digital privacy--not for Edward Snowden, but for smaller attackers. 'Yes, the big bad guys still matter, but fighting a billion little bad guys probably matters more.' A thoughtful hour on privacy." (Alistair for Hugh).
  • Why Do Many Reasonable People Doubt Science? - National Geographic"There's been a huge push-back against vaccine deniers since measles made a reappearance in North America. But, most of the rebuttals have used science to try and change behavior, and that's precisely the wrong approach: it actually makes people dig in more. This National Geographic piece looks at the roots of unscientific thinking. Like it or not, if you're a scientist and you want to change the world, you have to deal with the messy minds of humans." (Alistair for Mitch).
  • Why reading and writing on paper can be better for your brain - The Guardian. "I'm a digital reader, and while I love a lot about reading ebooks, I've been thinking lately about all the things ebooks do badly. I'm not sure that 'reading on paper' is the necessary answer, but we have a long way to go to design digital ebook reading experiences that accommodate for the weaknesses of screens, while incorporating more of the benefits of digital. Anyway, turns out that paper is better for your noggin." (Hugh for Alistair).
  • Scrawled Insults and Epiphanies - The New York Review of Books. "One of the things that ebooks handle badly is notes readers put in the margins." (Hugh for Mitch).
  • Lockheed Martin's new fusion reactor might change humanity forever - Sploid. "This world of ours will require a lot more power and energy (especially with all of the issues that oil has caused us over the years). We also want life to be a lot more like science fiction, right? Well, this is another one of those fascinating pieces about what some of the world's biggest corporations are doing to plot the future. I don't, necessarily, feel like this is all being done for the good of all... it's obviously being done for capitalist reasons, but it's still interesting to see these bigs problems being tackled. And, we all know that a fusion reactor sounds like the right kind of energy to get me one of them X-Wing fighters!" (Mitch for Alistair).
  • Leonard Cohen's Montreal - The New Yorker. "One of the most iconic figures of our time. One of the most interesting cities in North America. How culture weaves through this person and the city he grew up in... and how it transcended the back alleys of the famed plateau area that inspired him so much. This happened in my backyard. It's just a few blocks from where I am writing this. We're all pretty lucky to live here." (Mitch for Hugh).

Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play.

By Mitch Joel

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February 27, 2015 7:17 PM

The Conflict Of Media... And Digital Media

Well, this is uncomfortable.

I spend a lot of time - in boardrooms and on stages across the world - trying to explain to brands why a digital marketing agency is so fundamentally different from a lot of traditional advertising and media agencies. It can get uncomfortable. There is no doubt that many of these traditional institutions have done a great job, at adding in digital services, hiring the right people, or have attempted to transform their businesses. In a simplistic way, my train of thought is this: while many agencies and companies are doing their best to transform into being more (or fully) digital, this is the kind of work that Mirum has been doing for the brands that we work with for over fifteen years. So, while traditional agencies try to evolve and transform, we have been what they are trying to become for over a decade. There is a difference. Chris Hughes was one of the founders of Facebook. He then went on to be an integral component in the online organizing for Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign. After that, he purchased the magazine, The New Republic. His Silicon Valley approach to the traditional magazine/publishing legacy created a well-documented friction with some of the best journalists in America. Hughes recently discussed the situation on Charlie Rose. It's a tough watch. On one hand, the evolution to digital is one that Hughes is very capable of leading. On the other hand, it feels like Rose is schooling a second year journalism student on what it means to be a journalist, and in the media. No matter which side you may choose to defend, one thing is for certain: we are not yet through this moment of purgatory. The new entities will continue to disrupt. The traditional entities will claim that they have already migrated, but the truth will be obvious to most.

If you're fascinated with media, you must watch this... 

By Mitch Joel

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February 26, 201511:31 PM

Pay Attention To Net Neutrality

In The United States Today, An Important Decision Was Made About The Future Of The Internet.

The term "net neutrality" has been in our zeitgeist for the past few years. Many were not sure when (or if) these changes would become law. It has happened. It is not a completely clear and obvious thing, but it is here. Do you believe that certain people (or companies) are entitled to have faster access to the Internet? Do you believe that if that should take place, it would be fair for some people (or companies) to not be able to get their content/information fast enough (or at all) to an audience? Yes, it's that complex.

The vote has passed.

The Internet will be treated like a utility (must like electricity, etc..). What does all of this really mean? John Oliver's thirteen minute segment on Last Week Tonight from last June is funny, true and should give you everything you really need to know about net neutrality... and what it means...

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Net Neutrality (HBO).

By Mitch Joel

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February 23, 2015 8:47 AM

Welcome To The Future: Apple And Google Cars, Anyone?

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio broadcasting out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is... Read more

By Mitch Joel

Utilities:


February 22, 2015 9:39 AM

What Does It Take To Be A Billionaire That Changes The World?

Episode #450 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. We live in amazing times. We are both at the frontier of what is coming next and also in... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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February 21, 2015 9:13 AM

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #244

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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February 19, 201511:53 PM

Are You Working In Digital Marketing? You Have To Be Drunk Not To Pay Attention To This.

Want to understand what the true digital landscape looks like? Last May, I introduced you to Scott Galloway. Galloway has a think tank called L2 and is also a marketing professor at NYU Stern. He is becoming more widely known for... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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February 17, 201511:34 PM

What Does Great Work Look Like?

Is what you are creating any great? Over the years, I have watched many super-creative people with amazing taste quit. They didn't push through. They didn't keep at it. For as many great bloggers that I follow today, I have... Read more

By Mitch Joel

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